Josh Fryer | He Is F**king Legend!
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He Is F**king Legend!

It seems like it has been a millennia, but after a sad attempt at seeing my favorite band, I saw them twice, in a row. I started listening to He Is Legend pretty much from the start. Already being a fan of heavy rock, hardcore and metal core (or whatever the critics are calling it now) I naturally followed the likes of Solid State Records, Victory Records and the likes of Ferret and Trustkill Records pretty closely. They were the obvious labels touting the style of music that I couldn’t get enough of. With the exception of a few, all of the (countless number of) bands started to sound the same after a while though; no one was breathing life into the music that I loved. Then, these guys from North Carolina came along and changed my view of hard rock forever.

I say that I was into these guys pretty much at the beginning of their discography only because I, like many others,  hopped onto the He Is Legend bandwagon with the release of 2004’s I Am Hollywood. This album will ALWAYS hold a soft spot in my heart as it was the first time I had heard a band that had the melodies of the screamo bands of the era, but had more of a southern metal undertone to the music. It was a nice departure from the obnoxiously chuggy and simple hardcore at that moment. I Am Hollywood had the perfect trifecta of elements that, in my opinion, make a perfect album: Awesome tunes, awesome production and awesome artwork. The songs on this album are perfect; no contest. The album was recorded by Adam D. from Killswitch Engage in the studio that Killswitch recorded The End of Heartache in (my other favorite album from 2004). And to top this awesome sandwich off, the album artwork was created by Invisible Creature (not Invisible Monster, which Schuyler will tell you) which was pretty standard for most of the Solid State bands at the time. That shit is perfect. Little did I know, my music fandom was about to be completely cemented AGAIN in a couple of years.

The record that I will always think of when I hear this band is 2006’s Suck Out The Poison. Also released on Solid State Records, this album is STILL on my daily spin cycle (sometimes daily depending on the week). I can remember getting this album the week it dropped and wearing it out to the point it made it to the tippy top of my top 25 played songs in iTunes. The more southern style of the record took what I Am Hollywood did from a song writing perspective and then gave it some more beef. Specifically, songs like “Attack of the Dungeon Witch,” “Electronic Throat,” and “The Widow of Magnolia,” just to name a few, are very, VERY southern. The added sauce to the metal core scene in that year was definitely southern influences across the board. I mean, these dudes are from North Carolina, it only makes sense. This album is by far my favorite album by He Is Legend. My favorite song by the band is the last track on the record entitled “(((louds,” which in my opinion, again, is the best song in their catalog. Holy shit. That song is awesome.

How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history.

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